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Saturday, 4 November 2017

Amber Alert for Father Who Abducted Baby Son in Southern California

Jefferson Gomes
Jefferson Gomes


Los Angeles 
County Sheriff’s Department shows a photo of two-month-old baby Jefferson Gomes whose father, Jeffrey Michael Gomes, a 42-year-old man of Asian descent, has abducted and is considered armed and dangerous.

Amber alert says the father and baby were last seen Friday afternoon, Nov. 3, 2017, in Fort Tejon, an area on the Grapevine section of Interstate 5 about halfway between Los Angeles and Bakersfield. (Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department via AP)



An Amber Alert has been issued in Southern California for a father who authorities say has abducted his 2-month-old son and is considered armed and dangerous.

The alert says the father and baby were last seen Friday afternoon in Fort Tejon, an area on the Grapevine section of Interstate 5 about halfway between Los Angeles and Bakersfield. Several hours later, there had been no reported sightings of the pair.

Authorities say the suspect is Jeffrey Michael Gomes, a 42-year-old man of Asian descent who is 6 feet tall and weighs about 200 pounds.

His son is 2-month-old Jefferson Gomes.

The Amber Alert says the two were last seen in a 2007 white Chevrolet pickup truck with California license plate 02390P1.

What is Amber Alert?

According to wikipedia an AMBER Alert or a Child Abduction Emergency (SAME code: CAE) is a child abduction alert system. It originated in the United States in 1996.

AMBER is officially a contrived acronym for America's Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response, but was named after Amber Hagerman, a 9-year-old abducted and murdered in Arlington, Texas, in 1996. 

Alternative regional alert names were once used; in Georgia, "Levi's Call"(in memory of Levi Frady); in Hawaii, "Maile Amber Alert"(in memory of Maile Gilbert); and Arkansas, "Morgan Nick Amber Alert"(in memory of Morgan Nick).

In the United States, AMBER Alerts are distributed via commercial radio stations, Internet radio, satellite radio, television stations, and cable TV by the Emergency Alert System and NOAA Weather Radio (where they are termed "Child Abduction Emergency" or "Amber Alerts"). 

The alerts are also issued via e-mail, electronic traffic-condition signs, commercial electronic billboards, or through wireless device SMS text messages. AMBER Alert has also teamed up with Google,Bing,and Facebook to relay information regarding an AMBER Alert to an ever-growing demographic: AMBER Alerts are automatically displayed if citizens search or use map features on Google or Bing. 

With the Google Child Alert (also called Google AMBER Alert in some countries), citizens see an AMBER Alert if they search for related information in a particular location where a child has recently been abducted and an alert was issued. 

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